Catch-up tv holidays

Rattrapage télé des vacances

Our consumption of tv (and other platforms) has increased in the last few months. Containment requires, you’ve probably already done a little bit of catch-up, but if you are looking for some suggestions of series for the holidays, here are some which stood out since the beginning of this year, out of the ordinary.

Series quebec

It IS LIKE THAT THAT I LOVE You

Suburb of Sainte-Foy, mid-70’s, two pairs of friends-neighbors leave their kids at camp, and realize the gaps in their marital relationships. Through infidelities and other secrets, and the result of a miscommunication, they will become wanted criminals, leaving their lives beige for organized crime. This series written by François Létourneau and carried out by Jean-François Rivard (accomplices of the Invincible and black Series) is both surprising and tasty, and featured characters ultra well dug in that we provide pure entertainment.

  • Here Tou.tv Extra

MY SON

A taboo subject, schizophrenia, treated with great delicacy and credibility. Antoine L’écuyer book a performance moving in the skin of Jacob, a young person whose disease develops progressively and as his hallucinations are increasing. This series also depicts the helplessness of his mother Marielle (Élise Guilbault), this in the face of all his fights, and his loved ones. It follows the steps of his awareness, of his desire to confront the beast, independently, until he befriends his new reality and learn to cope with it.

  • Club illico

KING STREET

A bold concept and entertaining. Although there is a narrative reflected, one never knows quite where we will lead the episodes of this sitcom. Pier-Luc Funk, and Marie-Ève Morency play two roommates in their twenties who welcome Sophie (Cadieux), a quarantenaire out. But unlike conventional tv, Stéphane Bellavance, acts as game master and dictates the intrigues and ways to react to the actors-improvisers. The experience is quite fun and gives rise to a few stalls tasty.

  • Club illico

Series in link with current events

I MAY DESTROY YOU

Hard to put a label on this series, which, without being heavy or dramatic, deals with a certain black humour to the topic of sexual assault and non-consent. Michaela Coel, author, actress and designer, embodies Arabella, a milléniale, which was a hit on the social networks where she keeps a journal of his generation has even been the subject of a book. In lack of inspiration, it multiplies the outputs and drifts, until the day she wakes up with no memory of his last evening soaked. Back the facts, she discovers the aftermath of his assault and sees his life turned upside-down. Very current and well addressed.

  • Crave

JEFFREY EPSTEIN: FILTHY RICH

Designed as a series of true crime, the four episodes of this series feature testimonies from survivors of abuse, this sexual predator and police officers who conducted the survey since 2005. It goes back to the facts through the archives. One comes quickly to wonder how the financial, stopped in 2019, and then found dead a month later in his cell, was able to draw for so long despite the numerous lawsuits. It is also difficult to see that his accomplice, Ghislaine Maxwell, was arrested a few days ago, was able to run rampant for so long, by recruiting girls, often minor, to satisfy the sexual instincts of Epstein and prestigious, and wealthy, friends.

  • Netflix

TRUMP: AN AMERICAN DREAM

Only one set of this list not to be output in 2020, it requires the same when the glance in the wake of the publication of the memoirs of Mary Trump, Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man. Here are four episodes (released in 2018) that paints a portrait of the man most powerful and the most controversial of the planet, Donald Trump. If the first episode shows us a young man ambitious to be relatively friendly, the other three are state of his or her personality brittle, and without concession, its financial management is deficient and his technical talk a lot for say nothing. It’s quite fascinating, even unhealthy, to attend to the building of his empire, not always very clean.

  • Netflix

LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE

Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington share the spotlight in this miniseries adapted from the novel by Celeste Ng, which is recorded as a successful example of systemic racism. Mia, an African-American, photographer, and mother, moves into a house that he rents out Elena. Mothers and girls develop friendships. Thinking to do well, Elena gives a job at her home in Mia. Illustration quite startling racism of the “benevolent” perpetuating a divide between the social classes, between Blacks and Whites. A critical effective of the american company that leads the two women to maintain a relationship toxic, which will have an impact on their daily lives.

  • Amazon Prime Video

Series to discover

HOLLYWOOD

New series from the prolific Ryan Murphy takes us behind the scenes of the Hollywood of the 40s. Its particularity is to leave us to hover between reality and fiction as some of the protagonists really existed. Industry that dream, it discovers vulnerabilities through a group of young artists, ambitious of which some were willing to go very far to know the glory. The inequalities are glaring. Racism is seen as homosexuality and the abuse of power. Let’s say that some had to bassesses today reprochables for hope to shine. While other, more combative, had the feeling to help change the world.

  • Netflix

THE LAST DANCE

It is not necessary to be a fan of basketball to appreciate the qualities of this documentary series is fascinating. First, for the richness of the images. Here we have an access to unpublished in the 1997-1998 season when Michael Jordan (of which it was the last season), his teammates, Rodman, and Pippen, and the Chicago Bulls were the sport. And then for its archives many and his testimonies diverse. Finally, for its breathless rhythm and her mount tight that keep us hooked. A slice of sporting history comes with a way to make a modern.

  • Netflix

NORMAL PEOPLE

This series irish has quickly become a favorite of the containment and its young actors have distinguished themselves by their charisma. Any objection’connell and Marianne. It is sporty and popular, she is lonely and brittle. Yet, they are attracted one by the other. A relationship first discrete settles at the end of adolescence. It is the discovery of the other with authenticity and insecurity. A carnal side rarely operated in this way. Then, this relationship develops as they both try to live through their experiences, forge its character. The dialogues of Sally Rooney, being described as the voice of the milléniaux, are very well woven, dealing with delicate feelings of love and the relationship to the intimacy. A universal subject.

  • GEM (gem.cbc.ca)
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