COVID Revolution: Major medical discoveries and new behaviors

COVID revolution: Major medical changes and new behaviors

MISE & Agrave; DAY

Medicine will never be the same again after the electroshock of Covid-19, which notably accelerated the development of a panoply of technologies and forced significant awareness.

Great Revolution
Health File

“Made in Quebec” medical equipment & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp;

If there is one lesson that the health system will have learned, it is the importance of not depending on other countries for the supply of gowns, gloves and other equipment medical. & nbsp;

States will undoubtedly make sure they are ready for a next pandemic, a bit like the armies which are always ready for war, illustrates Benoît Mâsse, professor at the School of public health of the University of Montreal.

Moreover, Dr. Gilbert Boucher notices that most of the masks he uses now are made in Quebec. & Nbsp;

“And they are excellent masks”.

“We realize that we cannot do everything in China,” explains André-Pierre Contandriopoulos, professor at the School of Public Health at the University of Montreal. It's a bit like farming: there are things we can do at home, even if it costs a little more. “

More efficient medicine thanks to techno & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp;

Medicine is undergoing a revolution thanks to artificial intelligence and all the technological innovations precipitated by the pandemic, believes Dr. Karl Weiss, specialist in infectious diseases at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal.

For example, microbiological tests now allow instant detection and can be done just about anywhere and by anyone, illustrates Karl Weiss.

Remote monitoring devices can diagnose ear infections or record the data from the thorax of a patient who is at home, he adds.

In addition, the accumulation of data will make it possible to better follow the clinical trajectory of patients. Thus, when a 40-year-old woman with chest pain calls Info Santé, we will be able to tell her that the probability of a heart attack is very low because we will know that out of the thousands of people with the same profile and the same symptoms, only one was hospitalized.

“We are heading towards a transformed medicine”, summarizes Karl Weiss.

More remote consultations & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp;

Why come in person for a sore who can be the subject of a remote consultation? Many clinics went virtual during the pandemic, and many patients obtained a prescription or medical advice with a simple phone call or video call. Telemedicine is therefore here to stay, the experts interviewed are convinced.

“It will allow us to optimize the way we practice medicine,” believes Dr. Judy Morris, president of the Association of Quebec emergency physicians.

In some places, telemedicine will allow people to avoid having to drive two hours or pay for parking, illustrious Mylaine Breton, professor at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Sherbrooke. & Nbsp;

Its use could even be broadened to facilitate access to mental health care in regions where there is a shortage of interveners, she suggests.

But in all cases, it will be necessary to find the right correct dosage of telemedicine since some health problems cannot be assessed remotely, experts remind.

Messenger RNA to treat cancer & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp;

The development of messenger RNA technology, used in vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna, has been accelerated “exponentially” and could be used to treat a variety of other diseases, notes Alain Lamarre, immunovirologist at the National Institute. of scientific research.

For example, this technology could make it possible to create personalized treatments in oncology, such as “encoding messenger RNA so that our system develops an immune response to our own cancer ”, illustrates Mr. Lamarre.

No more 5-7 when you have a fever & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp;

There was a time when a person with a cold and obviously contagious could show up in a 5-7 without anyone blinking. Experts believe those days are over as the pandemic has brought about a culture change. “That era is over. This is no longer acceptable, “summarizes Dr. Gilbert Boucher. “We're going to keep a little embarrassment before going into a non-essential activity with a little fever and cough, saying to ourselves that 'it's not that bad,'” says Dr. Caroline Quach. “And if activity is essential, well, we wear the mask,” she adds.

Better management of drug stocks & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp;

If Quebec succeeded in avoiding the catastrophe of a drug shortage at the heart of the first wave, it is thanks to a new storage method that will continue to be used in the future.

Before, health professionals stored few drugs to prevent unused doses from becoming obsolete and therefore wasted. & Nbsp;

It was the just in time method, summarizes François Paradis, president of Association of Pharmacists of Health Establishments of Quebec.

Healthcare establishments now keep an inventory that corresponds to 90, 60 or 30 days of their usual consumption, depending on the type, explains Jean-François Bussières, former chairman of the pharmacists committee of the Government Acquisitions Center.

“One thing is certain, we will not come back to the just in time method”, concludes Mr. Paradis.

With Clara Loiseau

The mask, as in Asia & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp;

The mask will still be visible in the landscape when the pandemic subsides, much like what was done in Asia before, experts believe. & Nbsp;

People will likely tend to wear it in public when they show symptoms of a cold or in public transport, for example.

Those who make this choice “will no longer be looked at askance,” says Dr. Caroline Quach, head of traffic control. infections at CHU Sainte-Justine.

“We can imagine Public Health calling on the population to wear it” at times, supposes André-Pierre Contandriopoulos, professor at the School of Public Health at the University of Montreal.

In clinics and hospitals, the mask could continue to be used to prevent respiratory infections other than Covid-19, believes Dr. Judy Morris of the Quebec Association of Emergency Physicians.

Better monitoring of new viruses & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp;

“I don't think anybody else thinks infectious disease matters anymore,” says Dr Karl Weiss. & Nbsp;

If a new pandemic were to strike in 10 or 15 years, laboratories as well as public health authorities will be better prepared to react to it, believe several experts.

“Before, there were people who had to fight to recall the importance of infection prevention, ”says Dr. Caroline Quach.

In addition, we can expect a return to the “heyday” of public health, an area that has been gradually defined in Quebec in recent years, recalls Benoît Mâsse of the School of Public Health of the University. of Montreal. & nbsp;

Hospital rooms that are better insulated & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp;

“A new emergency is a single room with doors that close,” says Dr. Gilbert Boucher, president of the Association of Specialists in Emergency Medicine of Quebec. & nbsp;

< p>Thus, we will see fewer and fewer rooms crowded with patients separated by curtains, he predicts.

In most emergencies, ventilation systems have been installed, isolation and the partitioning of the rooms has been improved, he adds. & nbsp;

“It's going to stay and it's very good.”

In general, there is a change in mentality which means that the level of patient protection has really increased, observes the doctor. & nbsp;

For example, hospitals now offer washing of uniforms. We therefore see fewer nurses and attendants walking around in working clothes in the street, notes Dr Boucher.

Recurrent vaccinations & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp ; & nbsp; & nbsp;

Adults are likely to have to roll up their sleeves regularly to be inoculated against Covid-19, much like seasonal flu does, some experts suspect.

Benoît Mâsse, professor of public health, paints the hypothetical image of vaccination campaigns that would take place once a year or every two years so that people go and get their booster.

“Or maybe that it will be just a part of the population that will be vaccinated periodically, such as 50 years or 70 years and over, “abounds the immunovirologist Alain Lamarre.

Of course, it will depend on how which will evolve the virus and its variants, qualify the experts.

Precious “guardian angels” & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp;

Many experts believe that we will not soon forget how precious the work of the “guardian angels” is, even if we manage to overcome the shortage of personnel one day.

The pandemic will have forced us to reconsider the importance of providing pleasant conditions for our health professionals, explains Mylaine Breton, professor at the University of Sherbrooke. & Nbsp;

“This is a project for the next 10 years.”

The Covid-19 revealed how the healthcare system was failing, even if it had been for decades, abounds André- Pierre Contandriopoulos, from the School of Public Health at the University of Montreal. Nothing is certain, but the pandemic could act like an “electric shock” finally forcing leaders to make a positive and profound change in the system, he hopes.

The Covid turns our lives upside down, but not only negatively. In this dossier, Le Journal highlights the legacy that this virus will leave in our lives.

Major dossier A revolution in all fields Consumption
and culture Everything happens online, back to reading and promotion of local purchasing Health Major medical discoveries and new behaviors In the office Reinvented hours and places, work put back in its rightful place Education New pedagogies and sharing of knowledge In the city Green districts and hybrid housing

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