Died in Malaysia male sumatrensis Rhino

Умер последний в Малайзии самец суматранского носорога

Умер последний в Малайзии самец суматранского носорога

Died in Malaysia male sumatrensis Rhino

In the reserve there was only one female.

May 28, 2019 at 13:44

657

Sumatran rhinoceros (lat. Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) is the smallest member of the family: his height 112-145 cm, body length 236-318 cm, weight 800-2000 pounds. For comparison, the Indian rhinoceros grows to 380 cm and 186 cm in height. Sumatran rhinos have 2 horns, one small and the second 25 cm. Most of the body is covered with reddish-brown hair.

The animal inhabiting South-East Asia, belongs to the species on the brink of extinction: the planet was about 100 individuals. The main culprits are poachers kill rare animals for their horns. In 2008, the wild were caught 20-year-old male, named Tam (Tam). He was transported to the Malaysian reserve, Tabin Wildlife Reserve, where people could ensure his safety. A few years later the company he was two females and it turned out to be an important and timely measure: according to 2015, in the wild of Malaysia, there was not one individual of this species.

The reserve’s specialists tried to help animals continue to race, including using the IVF procedure. However, success is not crowned; besides, one of the females recently died of cancer. And on may 27 did not tema. The official conclusion about the cause of death has not yet been done, but, according to preliminary data, he suffered from diseases of the kidneys and liver. This may be due to age: the average life expectancy of Sumatran rhinos is 35-40 years.

Scattered populations of Sumatran rhinos still left in the wilds of Indonesian Borneo and Sumatra. The specialists underline that now it is important to find them and to bring in the reserves to preserve the species and to provide the remaining individuals conditions for reproduction. However, because of the small populations breeding potential of animals is reduced. Besides, Sumatran rhinos are solitary and come together only for mating, making it difficult to find wild specimens even with helicopters.

Malaysian reserve hopes to persuade Indonesia to join efforts in saving the species. Although Susie Ellis, Executive Director of the International Rhino Foundation, in a statement noted that past attempts to obtain progeny from Malaysian and Indonesian representatives Sumatran rhinos have been unsuccessful. If the situation does not improve, the animals may suffer the fate of their Northern white counterparts.

Share Button