“Revolution”: the strength of the group

“Revolution”: the strength of the group

BETTING À DAY

Éklectik showed an undeniable superiority, Sunday evening, during the first face-to-face broadcast of “Rvolution”. When they dance, the four girls have a rather impressive rigor and sense of precision. Each of their gestures is perfectly coordinated with the others, and nothing sticks out. 

To be so synchronized with each movement, the girls work tirelessly on their choreographies. 

“It’s really a lot of hours of rehearsal, explained Catherine. Once all the movements of the choreography are created, we will go over them one by one and specify the angle with which we must do them. We will specify all the details down to our fingertips so that everything is synchronized and we are all the same. We keep working hard to make it work.”

After having fiercely distinguished themselves in the ballot to keep their place, the work paid off for them, since the three masters gave them their vote at the end of the head-to-head. They are also the only ones who obtained this score during the evening. 

“We worked hard to get what we wanted, and we were finally quite confident when we arrived on the scene, said Audrey-Anne. Our deepest desire was to win all three votes, but we were unsure of the outcome. We were proud that Lydia gave us her vote, which she hadn't done at the audition.”

A common inspiration

The Éklectik's participation in “Revolution” is a bit of a consequence of the pandemic. 

“We understood that everything could stop at any time, and we also had a strong desire to push our dance further, explains Orélie. The opportunity to do this show is enormous and we decided to go all out, we wanted it to become a source of motivation for us, and also for the others.

In the competition, they present themselves as an example of strong women who tell a story and who put forward the power of women. They also see themselves as role models for the youngest. 

“Our goal is to build a platform to encourage young people,” said Catherine. We now want to give back to young people, to future generations. The four of us are now teaching dance and we want to be lights in their lives and in their passion.”

To try to shine until the final, Éklectik has a plan for each of the next steps. “With our coach, we prepared all our choreographies, revealed Alycia. We know what we're going to do later in the adventure, and above all we're ready to go all the way.”

Mikaël St-Hilaire, 21, Bécancour

Mikaël and Laurent gave the impression of making a duo more than a competitive face-to-face, as their numbers seemed to dialogue together and respond to each other in true harmony. After being injured during rehearsals, Mikaël was not in his best shape. 

“We had a month to prepare the face-to-face number, but for two and a half weeks, my back was crossed. I couldn't train. The first time I did my full number was on the stage of “Revolution”. I had extra stress because I had to be good and make it through this time.” 

The young dancer is not fully recovered from his injury, but he can keep dancing.

Théo, 15 years old, Saint-Lambert

“Revolution” was a source of motivation to encourage Theo to continue on this path.

“When I started dancing, there were several shows on TV, like 'The Next Step', which were very popular. A year later, “Revolution” arrived, and it became a motivation to try to become like the dancers I saw evolving. They were models for me and that's what pushed me to continue.” 

Théo captivated the masters and the public with his number against Hybride, who combined technique , theatricality and emotion. 

“I wanted to push my research further by proposing movements that we had not yet seen. My audition number was in the scream, but there, I tried to go more gently.”

He also approaches this experience with a certain philosophy. 

< p>“I'm young, I'm just 15, and I didn't even think I'd get into the audition. Face to face, it's the same thing. I was not stressed. For me, it's just one more experience to go for.”

Sébastien Leroux, 17, Orléans, Ontario

Sébastien was a little surprised to be put in front of Leia for this stage, but he was confident enough of his number not to let himself be destabilized. Finally, the masters highlighted his talent. 

“At the audition, it was my first experience, I didn’t have that much confidence in my performance. For this second stage, it was an even more competitive environment and it boosted my confidence. I also wanted to prove to the masters that I belonged on this show.”

He also demonstrated that he understood technique and the importance of revolution in competition. 

“My first revolution was quite high caliber and I wanted to go even further, while keeping the technical and conceptual side. I went in with a move that was pretty hard to pull off, but fit perfectly into my story.” 

A regular on the show from the start, Sébastien felt his time had come to shine on this stage. 

“Last year, I started doing contracts when I discovered my side more artistic. “Revolution” is an interesting platform to show me to as many people as possible.”

The candidates selected this week:

Mikaël St-Hilaire, 21 years old, Bécancour

Joanne and Anton, 49 and 42 years old, Toronto

Théo, 15 years old, Saint-Lambert

Éklectik, 16 to 22 years old, Quebec

TNV, 16 to 20 years old, Montreal and surroundings< /p>

Sébastien Leroux, 17, Orleans, Ontario